For fifth-graders, going to middle school involves transition into a new world

This+mobile+hangs+above+the+inside+entrance+to+Watertown+Middle+School.+
This mobile hangs above the inside entrance to Watertown Middle School.

This mobile hangs above the inside entrance to Watertown Middle School.

Splash photo Martha Aramthip

Splash photo Martha Aramthip

This mobile hangs above the inside entrance to Watertown Middle School.

Martha Aramthip, Ryan Leonard, and Alex Miller

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






     Pushing open the coquelicot doors and stepping into the narrow tiled hallway, to the right you can see the doors to the Peter B. Clough Memorial Auditorium. Looking over to the left shows a large doorway to the cafeteria.

     It’s a lot to take in, until you look up and see a giant mobile staring down at you. Six of the seven continents shine down onto the faces of the children. The sounds of chattering fill the room and confused faces are everywhere.

     This is the Watertown Middle School, where new sixth-graders will learn skills like success, ownership, achievement, respect, and service for the next three years.

     Throughout the transition between fifth to sixth grade, one question is always debated: Which grade is better?

     While some students, like Anita Unseethaharuthai and Angelina Sturtevant say that sixth grade is better, others, like Kailee Dejesus and Elizabeth Parmley disagree, saying fifth grade was better.

      There are many reasons why one is better than the other for students. Shannon Fitzpatrick says, “Middle school is better because there’s more independence. I don’t miss elementary school.”

     Anna Zarkadas adds this, stating how the lack of lines makes middle school a lot more comfortable.

     Meanwhile, Serena Calix says, “The teachers here are nice, and you have your own mind-set. I miss the elementary school a little bit. Middle school is good so far, and I don’t miss elementary school. Sixth grade is better.”  

Middle school is better because there’s more independence. I don’t miss elementary school.”

— SHANNON FITZPATRICK

     As we all know, the transition doesn’t come easy. The first day is most definitely the worst, getting lost in the labyrinth of classrooms and hallways. Ashley Leal says she likes elementary a little better because you didn’t have to switch classes, so you can’t get lost.

     In elementary school, the only place students move to is across the room. Being cooped up in the same room can be both a blessing and a curse.

     The big question is, “Where did recess go?” Even the eighth-graders still miss the 30 minutes of free time to run around or, in some cases, do homework. Recess was the one time in the school day when kids could just relax. The closest thing that WMS students get to recess is going outside for gym class or during lunch — but even then they don’t get to do whatever they want.

     Another difference is that this year’s sixth-graders got used to being the oldest class in elementary school, but this year they are forced to start over and be the youngest again.

     Some kids think that with middle school comes freedom. Others came to the conclusion that recess is more important than not having to walk in lines. Anna Zarkadas says, “There’s more freedom in middle school, there are no lines, and you can leave your class whenever the bell rings.”

     Whereas Elizabeth Parmley disagrees: “Middle school is exciting, but I miss elementary school because there are too many people here.”

     All in all, middle and elementary school are very different. People have very different opinions over which is better.

     But, no matter what, students have to go through this transition whether they like it or not.

–April 17, 2017–

Print Friendly

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
For fifth-graders, going to middle school involves transition into a new world